The 2018 National Defense Strategy asserts that the United States is emerging from a post-Cold War period of “strategic atrophy.” On October 30, 2018, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a discussion with Secretary Mattis on how the National Defense Strategy seeks to meet the shared challenges of our time through strengthening and evolving America’s strategic alliances and partnerships. Join the conversation on Twitter with #MattisUSIP.

Read a transcript of the conversation.

Speakers

Secretary James N. Mattis
U.S. Department of Defense  

Nancy Lindborg, welcoming remarks 
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Stephen J. Hadley, moderator
Chair, Board of Directors, U.S. Institute of Peace

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